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Comey set to testify publicly about why Trump fired him

Comey set to testify publicly about why Trump fired him

Former FBI Director James Comey, who was sacked by U.S. President Donald Trump last week amid an agency probe into alleged Russian meddling in the U.S. election, has agreed to testify before the U.S. Senate Intelligence Committee at a public hearing, the committee said in a statement on Friday.

The news comes after Trump was hit by embarrassing leaks suggesting that a senior adviser was a "person of interest" in a probe of possible collusion with Russia during last year's election campaign, and that Trump had boasted to Russian officials of firing the man heading the investigation.

In that same conversation, Trump referred to Comey as "crazy" and "a real nut job", according to the Times.

In his earlier Twitter posts, Mr Trump criticised the naming of former Federal Bureau of Investigation director Robert Mueller as a special counsel by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, an official he had appointed. Richard Burr, and the ranking Democrat, Sen.

Senator Mark Warner, ranking member of the Committee, hoped that Comey's testimony will help answer some of the questions that have arisen since he was sacked by Trump last week. President Donald Trump has been narrowing a short list and interviewing candidates to replace FBI Director James Comey, whom Trump fired on May 9.

Former FBI Director Comey to testify before Senate intel committee
Comey is known to produce memos documenting especially sensitive or unsettling encounters, such as after the February meeting. The Senate and House intelligence committees are also probing possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Moscow.

Now, he'll have the opportunity to talk not just about Russian Federation investigation, but why Trump fired him.

Testifying in an open session, rather than a closed one, ensures that Comey's testimony will be public. Comey also reportedly filed a memo after a February 14 White House meeting in which he claimed that Trump asked him to end the FBI's investigation into former national security adviser Michael Flynn. But he made clear it was not his intention for Trump or other White House officials to use the document to justify firing Comey, which is what they have done.

"If you just parse the words that Donald Trump says, it does seem very close to a confession of obstruction of justice", Toobin said.

White House hopes that Trump could leave scandalous allegations at home were crushed in a one-two punch of revelations that landed shortly after his departure.

"I faced great pressure because of Russian Federation".

New footage shows Turkish president watching Washington brawl
An embassy statement said the group had "aggressively provoked Turkish-American citizens" who had gathered to greet Erdogan. The security detail, he continued, violated American laws on United States ground, and that can not happen.

"No. No. Next question", Mr Trump told a news conference in the White House, when asked if he "in any way, shape or form" ever urged Mr Comey to end the probe.

A small group of lawmakers known as the Gang of Eight were notified of the change in tempo and focus in the investigation at a classified briefing on Wednesday evening, the Post reported, citing the people familiar with the matter.

House members leaving a briefing by the deputy attorney general on the probe of connections between Russian Federation and Donald Trump's presidential campaign say they're frustrated at not getting answers.

The White House originally pointed to a recommendation from acting Attorney General Rod Rosenstein criticizing Comey's handling of the investigation into Hillary Clinton's private email server as the impetus for his firing.

In a statement, he said that Comey had put unnecessary pressure on the president's ability to conduct diplomacy with Russian Federation on matters such as Syria, Ukraine and the Islamic State. Mr Trump wrote on Thursday morning. "That's taken off, '" Democratic Senator Patrick Leahy said on Twitter.

US President Trump arrives in Saudi Arabia
More than a dozen horses flanked the presidential limousine Saturday as Trump was slowly driven to the Royal Court in Riyadh. Trump remains popular in the Gulf, where leaders hope he'll take a harder line on Iran than his predecessor Barack Obama.